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Archeology of Haller House

Documenting Coupeville's Unseen History

Did you know that all of Coupeville's downtown waterfront was the site of an important Skagit village?

The Washington State Department of Archaeology and Historic Preservation has known it for decades. Today, as we move forward to study, document and rehabilitate the historic Haller House property, our first step is to insure that we do not disturb hidden cultural resources on the land.


Before and after
archeology map

On the Coupeville waterfront, the Haller House property (red rectangle) sits just on the outside edge of a State-registered archaeology site.

Hole in the ground

Archaeologists with Fullscope NW will be conducting a site survey on Friday afternoon & Saturday, April 12-13, to help us plan upcoming foundation work on the Haller House.
Feel free to stop by and see how it goes!

Next Steps in the Haller House Rehab

The first step in rehabilitating the Haller House is its stabilization, top and bottom. Built on an eclectic system of piers - stone, cribbing and tree trunks - the house needs a real modern seismic-ready foundation. This will take lots of time and funding. But before a shovel can be put in the ground, an archaeological survey is essential to protecting the legacy of the Coast Salish people who called this land home for thousands of years.

Because of the enormity of the foundation project, and the complete failure of the roof, Historic Whidbey will be replacing the cedar shingle roof prior to beginning foundation work. Thanks to generous grants from the Ebey's Forever Fund, the Coupeville Festival Association and the Washington Trust for Historic Preservation, you can look forward to seeing the new roof installed early this summer!